To Post or Not to Post? (#8)

“Are you going to post it?”

I got asked the question several times – meaning, would I post “No Trespassing” signs at the edges of my property? I debated it for about a minute before deciding that I would. Personally, I don't want to wear an orange vest just to walk to the mailbox come fall. [continues] ...

 

A Driveway & An Address (#7)

Before I started this project, I'd never given a lot of thought to driveways. It turns out, they're pretty important.

Let's state the obvious: Rosy is a minivan, and has about six inches of clearance underneath. Which makes her a great vehicle for traveling and sleeping in, but no good at all for getting across an 18-inch culvert separating the land from the road. [continues] ...

 

An Impulse Buy? Flat & Affordable (#2)

By February I'd located five properties I wanted to look at, including one which included 13 acres for only $11,000. But all of these seemingly bargain-bin prices turned out to have very distinct reasons: chief among them, then land was often inaccessible.

The 13 acres was up a snowmobile trail, landlocked by farms on all sides. Another was off a seasonal road impassable to vehicles several months of the year (but not to the skiers who helped me find the property). And what could anyone do with four acres of land all on a six percent grade? In the end, one piece of land stood out. It was 5.55 acres in Hector, within a half hour of Ithaca and almost exactly 10 minutes from both Trumansburg (which has a few good bars, a coffee shop, organic grocery and an exceptional pizza place), and the wineries along Seneca lake. [continues] ...

 
 

How a City Boy Wound Up Living in the Woods: The Inevitable Exposition (#1)

In late April I bought five and a half acres in Hector, N.Y., and have been working to put a small cabin on the land. I've had to hire an excavation company, apply for building permits, and learn to use a chainsaw to clear land for a driveway. Pretty much the opposite of my D.C. life. It's awesome. [continues] ...

Home sweet home?

Home sweet home?

The Cabin Episode (#3)

It turns out, you can buy a home on a credit card. I went out and looked at the cabin: They come as unfinished structures that you insulate, wire for electric if you want to, and so on. It felt sturdy, was far larger than the camper options I'd considered, had an actual door and windows, insulated floor. [continues] ...

 

Don't buy this saw.

Don't buy this saw.

My First Chainsaw (#5)

I had no idea how to buy a chainsaw. Did one ask questions? Was some sort of license needed for this zombie-killing weapon? What supplies did I need? My brother had showed me how to use his, and I'd cut a couple of small trees, but standing there in the store all I could see was … SAW.  [Continues]...

 

Follow @AwayFromTheThingsOfMan on Instagram  for for more tiny house-life, art, food, Ithaca, Washington, D.C., and #GonzoTheCat.

A Kid Again (#4)

The first morning I owned the land, I drove out there with a pair of hedge clippers, a shovel, a pellet gun and a six-pack. I set up a small table and chairs I'd brought along and spent the day plinking tin cans and hacking around in the brambles. A kid again [Continues] ...

My Second Chainsaw (#6)

I do most of my shopping at Tractor Supply Co. now. Which still feels ridiculous, but I can't seem to make it a day without finding something I need. Funnels. Fucking funnels. And you can't buy just one. [Continues] ...

________________

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Twelve Dreams
8.00 10.00

Part examination of dreams, part exploration of home. Twelve Dreams is a small volume of fiction and poetry that contemplates how a sense of place is tied to our nocturnal musings.

The volume includes stories "Tawgate" and "Memories of the Dying," as well as 12 dreams which have been transcribed and distilled into a coherent moment.

Volume is 72 pages; 6 x 9 inches.

Replicated Detritus: Postcards
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Replicated Detritus is a series of 10 postcards created from the fading papers of a more tactile world: encyclopedias, comic books, card catalogs, maps, newspapers, stamps.

Sure, the U.S. Postal Service may be on it's last legs, but there's still time for a shot of nostalgia. Who doesn't like opening the mailbox to find actual contact with a real human being? 

Conspiratorial
13.00 16.00

When out-of-work reporter Yuri Realman is approached by a government employee spouting conspiracy theories about a plot to control the world's resources, he reacts with the appropriate level of skepticism. But as evidence mounts, the two are plunged into a dangerous game of Washington intrigue and Realman is forced to admit that his mysterious new friend may really be onto something. 

Published in serial format, the four episodes include the "Conspiratorial" newsletter and detailed photographs of all of the clues, inviting close inspection for the reader to follow along and decide for themselves whether the conspiracy is fantasy or fact.

Conspiratorial eBook (Amazon link) Originally published as a four-part serial delivered by your friendly postal carrier, each envelope included a "newsletter" and photographs of the clues. But if real paper isn't your thing, this Amazon ebook version of Conspiratorial includes images of all the original clues, allowing the reader to follow along (without getting your hands dirty).

Conspiratorial eBook (Amazon link)

Originally published as a four-part serial delivered by your friendly postal carrier, each envelope included a "newsletter" and photographs of the clues. But if real paper isn't your thing, this Amazon ebook version of Conspiratorial includes images of all the original clues, allowing the reader to follow along (without getting your hands dirty).